Tuesday, 9 May 2017

New Book | Carbon Utilization: Applications for the Energy Industry | ed by Malti Goel & M Sudhakar, Springer

Carbon Utilization: Applications for the Energy Industry
Edited by Malti Goel & M Sudhakar. Springer, Green Energy and Technology Series, 2017, ISBN 9789811033520.

Summary: With the growing threat of climate change resulting from increasing accumulation of greenhouse gases, CO2-sequestration technology is seen as an assurance for continuation of fossil fuels use in coal based economies. The book is a fervent directive for research in terrestrial, bio-sequestration and CO2 utilization options in the context of climate change. The book has a wide coverage of topics in the nineteen chapters.  Policy dilemma for energy security in India, technology options for reducing carbon footprints, capacity development in carbon capture & removal processes and role of renewable energy technology are covered. The CO2 chemical and biological conversion routes, innovative chlathrate hydrate formations to cage CO2 and CO2 injection in earth reservoirs for enhanced recovery of fuels are other research topics explained by the leading scientists and technocrats with an Indian perspective. New applications for the aluminum, steel, cement and fertilizers industries towards a low carbon growth strategy are incorporated. Bridging the gap between research & industry in CO2 utilization is a fundamental challenge, which scientific community must face. In this context the book is a valuable knowledge bank to inspire scientists, researchers from academia & industry and policy makers alike. It may well be a teaching material in Environmental Science for postgraduate courses. 

Table of Contents
Part I CO2 Emission, Sequestration and Utilization: A Policy Dilemma for Energy Security
CO2 Capture and Utilization for the Energy Industry: Outlook for Capability Development to Address Climate Change in India | Malti Goel
Adoption and Introduction of Supercritical Technology in the Power Sector and Consequential Effects in Operation, Efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emission in the Present Context | V.S. Verma [Sample Chapter]
Low Carbon Technologies (LCT) and Carbon Capture & Sequestration (CCS)—Key to Green Power Mission for Energy Security and Environmental Sustainability | V.K. Sethi
Part II Terrestrial Sequestration Options for CO2 
Soil as Source and Sink for Atmospheric CO2 | Tapas Bhattacharyya, S.P. Wani, D.K. Pal and K.L. Sahrawat
Soil Carbon Stock and CO2 Flux in Different Ecosystems of North-East India | P.S. Yadava and Amrabati Thokchom
Baseline Data of Stored Carbon in Spinifex littoreus from Kadmath Island, Lakshadweep | Abhijit Mitra, J. Sundaresan, K. Syed Ali, Nabonita Pal, Upasana Datta, Ankita Mitra, Prosenjit Pramanick and Sufia Zaman
Assessment of Altitudinal Mediated Changes of CO2 Sequestration by Trees at Pachamalai Reserve Forest, Tamil Nadu, India | K. Suganthi, K. Rajiv Das, M. Selvaraj, S. Kurinji, Malti Goel and M. Govindaraju
Prospects in Mitigating Global Warming by Biomimetic Carbon Sequestration Using Recombinant Microbial Carbonic Anhydrases | T. Satyanarayana and Himadri Bose
Part III Low Carbon Growth Strategy from CO2 Utilization 
Climate Change Mitigation via Utilization of Carbon Dioxide | K. Palanivelu
Carbon Sequestration Through Solar Bioreactors: Industrial Strategies | K. Sudhakar and Ruma Arora Soni
Clathrate Hydrates: A Powerful Tool to Mitigate Greenhouse Gas | Pinnelli S.R. Prasad and Ch. V.V. Eswari
Carbon Sequestration and Utilization—India's Energy Woes | Gautam Sen
Coalbed Methane: Present Status and Scope of Enhanced Recovery Through CO2 Sequestration in India | Vinod Atmaram Mendhe, Alka D. Kamble, Mollika Bannerjee, Subhashree Mishra and Tanmay Sutay
A Low-Carbon Growth Strategy for India: Synergies from Oxy-Combustion, Carbon Capture, and ECBM | Thomas Weber
Part IV Current Research and Green Technology Perspective for Industry 
Carbon Dioxide Management—Aluminium Industry Perspective | Anupam Agnihotri, Suchita Rai and Nitin Warhadpande
Bioenergy Combined with Carbon Capture Potential by Microalgae at Flue Gas-Based Carbon Sequestration Plant of NALCO as Accelerated Carbon Sink | Ranjan R. Pradhan, Rati R. Pradhan, Siddhanta Das, Brajesh Dubey and Animesh Dutta
Current and Future Trends Toward Reduction of CO2 Emission from Steel Industries | Santanu Sarkar and Supriya Sarkar
Carbon Emissions and Their Mitigation in the Cement Sector | Shashank Bishnoi
Aqueous NH3 in CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Thermal Power Plant Flue Gas: N-Fertilizer Production Potential and GHG Emission Mitigation | Amitava Bandyopadhyay



Monday, 1 May 2017

Just Released | International Cooperation for Registration of Medicines: Opportunities for India

International Cooperation for Registration of Medicines: Opportunities for India
by Vasudha Wattal, Pallavi Joshi, Aashna Arora, and Ali Mehdi. ICRIER Health Policy Initiatives, and Academic Foundation, New Delhi, ISBN: 9789332704251. 

Summary: To tackle the rising burden of disease, disability and premature deaths, the demand for newer and better treatment is more than ever. Drug registration is a critical step for the introduction of medicines in a country. There has been a great deal of international interaction and cooperation in the area of public health, particularly since the conception of the Millennium Development Goals. However, international cooperation vis-à-vis mechanisms to achieve shared goals of public health are still very limited. Regulation of drugs, more specifically drug registration, is one such neglected area. This report, the first-of-its-kind, based on extensive desk and field research in 4 Indian states - Maharashtra, Karnataka, Gujarat and Telangana - and 7 countries - USA, UK, Switzerland, Germany, South Africa, Singapore and Indonesia - incorporates views of more than 150 stakeholders to identify lessons as well as opportunities for the Government of India in its effort to address challenges of drug regulation in particular, and public health more generally, in the country.


Table of Content

1. Introduction

2. Research Methodology

3. Analysis of Drug Registration Procedures and International Cooperation Initiatives

4. Cross-Country Implications for Stakeholders

5. A Game Theoritic Approach to Understanding International Cooperation

6. Policy Recommendations

7. Conclusion

Saturday, 29 April 2017

Just Released | Challenges and Prospects for Clinical Trials in India: A Regulatory Perspective

Challenges and Prospects for Clinical Trials in India: A Regulatory Perspective
by Rahul Mongia, Deepmala Pokhriyal, Seema Rao and Ali Mehdi. ICRIER Health Policy Initiatives, and Academic Foundation, New Delhi, ISBN: 9789332704268. 

Summary: Clinical trials are integral to drug discovery and bringing out newer and better medicines. With the evolution of India's disease burden as well as its pharmaceutical industry, the need for clinical trials has increased manifold. This report analyses prospects and challenges of clinical trials in India, focusing on New Chemical Entities and new drugs, and likewise proposes actionable policy recommendations for the Indian drug regulatory landscape so that the country can realize its untapped potential, while addressing concerns raised regarding the conduct and quality of clinical trials. The Government of India needs to develop a promotive ecosystem around clinical trials now more than ever, sooner rather than later. A clear set of policy, rules and guidelines around clinical trials would be a central component in the larger strategy to address India's public health challenges and incentivize the country's pharmaceutical industry to mature to the next level.


Table of Content

1. Introduction

2. Research Methodology

3. The Dilemmas Afflicting Clinical Research in India

4. Under Trial: The Challenges of Clinical Trials in India

5. Conclusions



Wednesday, 26 April 2017

Just Released | The United Nations World Water Development Report 2017 - Wastewater: The Untapped Resource

The United Nations World Water Development Report 2017 - Wastewater: The Untapped Resource
by WWAP (United Nations World Water Assessment Programme).  Paris, UNESCO, 2017, ISBN: 9789231002014.

Abstract: The 2017 edition of the United Nations WWDR, the forth in a series of annual, theme-oriented reports, addresses an often overlooked issue that is critical to water resources management and the provision of basic water-related services: wastewater. Maximizing wastewater's potential as a valuable and sustainable resource requires creation of enabling environment for change, including suitable legal and regulatory framework, appropriate financing mechanisms and social acceptance. With a political will to do so the current obstacles, such as lack of knowledge, capacity, data and information on wastewater, can be effectively overcome.

Summary: Most human activities that use water produce wastewater. As the overall demand for water grows, the quantity of wastewater produced and its overall pollution load are continuously increasing worldwide. Over 80% of the world's wastewater – and over 95% in some least developed countries – is released to the environment without treatment.
Once discharged into water bodies, wastewater is either diluted, transported downstream or infiltrates into aquifers, where it can affect the quality (and therefore the availability) of freshwater supplies. The ultimate destination of wastewater discharged into rivers and lakes is often the ocean with negative consequences for the marine environment.
The 2017 edition of the United Nations World Water Development Report, entitled "Wastewater: The Untapped Resource", demonstrates how improved wastewater management generates social, environmental and economic benefits essential for sustainable development and is essential to achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
In particular, the Report seeks to inform decision-makers, government, civil society and private sector, about the importance of managing wastewater as an undervalued and sustainable source of water, energy, nutrients and other recoverable by-products, rather than something to be disposed of or a nuisance to be ignored.
The report's title reflects the critical role that wastewater is poised to play in the context of a circular economy, whereby economic development is balanced with the protection of natural resources and environmental sustainability, and where a cleaner and more sustainable economy has a positive effect on the water quality.
Improved wastewater management generates social, environmental and economic benefits, and is essential to achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.


Table of Content

Foreword | by Irina Bokova, Director-General of UNESCO

Foreword | by Guy Ryder, Chair of UN-Water and Director-General of International Labour Organization

Preface | by Stefan Uhlenbrook, WWAP Coordinator and Richard Connor, Editor-in-Chief

Executive Summary

Prologue | State Of Water Resources: Availability and Quality

Part I Baseline and Context

Chapter 1 | Introduction | 1.1 Wastewater flows | 1.2 Wastewater as a resource: Seizing the opportunities

Chapter 2 | Wastewater and The Sustainable Development Agenda | 2.1 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development | 2.2 Potential synergies and conflicts

Chapter 3 | Governance | 3.1 Actors and roles | 3.2 Policy, law and regulation | 3.3 Financing | 3.4 Socio-cultural aspects

Chapter 4 | Technical Aspects Of Wastewater | 4.1 Wastewater sources and components | 4.2 Impacts of releasing untreated or inadequately treated wastewater | 4.3 Wastewater collection and treatment | 4.4 Data and information needs

Part II Thematic Focus

Chapter 5 | Municipal and Urban Wastewater | 5.1 Urbanization and its impact on wastewater production | 5.2 Urban forms | 5.3 Sources of wastewater in municipal and urban systems | 5.4 Composition of municipal and urban wastewater | 5.5 Urban form and the potential for municipal and urban wastewater use | 5.6 Managing urban runoff

Chapter 6 | Industry | 6.1 Extent of industrial wastewater generation | 6.2 Nature of industrial wastewater | 6.3 Addressing the resource challenge | 6.4 Wastewater and sustainable industrial development

Chapter 7 | Agriculture | 7.1 Agriculture as a source of water pollution | 7.2 Agriculture as a user of wastewater

Chapter 8 | Ecosystems | 8.1 The role and limits of ecosystems in wastewater management | 8.2 Planned use of wastewater for ecosystem services | 8.3 Operational and policy aspects

Part III Regional Aspects

Chapter 9 | Africa | 9.1 Water and wastewater in Sub-Saharan Africa | 9.2 Critical challenges | 9.3 The way forward

Chapter 10 | The Arab Region | 10.1 Context | 10.2 Challenges | 10.3 Responses

Chapter 11 | Asia and The Pacific | 11.1 Context and challenges | 11.2 Building resilient infrastructure | 11.3 A systems approach to wastewater by-product recovery | 11.4 Regulatory and capacity needs

Chapter 12 | Europe and North America | 12.1 Context | 12.2 Challenges | 12.3 Responses |

Chapter 13 | Latin America and The Caribbean | 13.1 The urban wastewater challenge | 13.2 Recent expansion of urban wastewater treatment | 13.3 Ongoing concerns and expanding opportunities | 13.4 Benefits of urban wastewater treatment | 13.5 Other sources of wastewater | 13.6 Lessons learned

Part IV Response Options

Chapter 14 | Preventing and Reducing Wastewater Generation and Pollution Loads At The Source | 14.1 Mechanisms for controlling and monitoring pollution | 14.2 Technical responses | 14.3 Financial approaches and behavioural change

Chapter 15 | Enhancing Wastewater Collection and Treatment | 15.1 Sewers and waterborne sanitation | 15.2 Low-cost sewerage | 15.3 Combined sewerage | 15.4 Decentralized treatment (DEWATS) | 15.5 Decentralized stormwater management | 15.6 Evolution of treatment technologies | 15.7 Sewer mining and component separation

Chapter 16 | Water Reuse and Resource Recovery | 16.1 Beneficial reuse of water | 16.2 Resource recovery from wastewater and biosolids | 16.3 Business models and economic approaches | 16.4 Minimizing risks to human health and the environment | 16.5 Regulations for water reuse | 16.6 Social acceptance of wastewater use

Chapter 17 | Knowledge, Innovation, Research and Capacity Development | 17.1 Trends in research and innovation | 17.2 Knowledge, research, technology and capacity-building gaps | 17.3 Future trends in wastewater management | 17.4 Capacity building, public awareness and collaboration among stakeholders |

Chapter 18 | Creating An Enabling Environment | 18.1 Technical options | 18.2 Legal and institutional frameworks | 18.3 Financing opportunities | 18.4 Enhancing knowledge and building capacity | 18.5 Mitigating human and environmental health risks | 18.6 Fostering social acceptance | 18.7 Coda



Friday, 21 April 2017

INDIGO Policy Brief: Science, Technology and Innovation, Comparative Analysis between EU-India and Other Countries: Indian Perspective | by V. V. Krishna & Rajiv Mishra, CSSP, JNU

Policy Brief: Science, Technology and Innovation, Comparative Analysis between EU-India and Other Countries: Indian Perspective
by V. V. Krishna with the assistance of Rajiv Mishra, CSSP, JNU.
INDIGO Policy, Centre for Social Innovation (ZSI), Austria, 2017.

Table of Contents
Introduction
1 Setting the context and background of the comparative analysis
2 Some comparisons between the EU multilateral and the non-EU bilateral cooperation from an Indian perspective
3 Gaps in comparative perspective of the EU multilateral and the non-EU bilateral Science and Technology cooperation
4 Comparative perspective on cooperation of Indian funding organisations with other countries
5 Gaps in comparative perspective of the EU funding and the non-EU countries funding mechanisms
6 Good practices of cooperation as seen from the Indian perspective | 6.1 India-United States S&T collaboration | 6.2 India-France S&T collaboration | 6.3 Indo-German S&T collaboration
7 Interviews with Indian funding organisations cooperating with Europe: Correlation with gaps analysis
8 Future of India-European Union Science and Technology cooperation: Key recommendations of comparative analysis


INDIGO Policy Brief: India Science and Technology Cooperation with EU and Other Select Countries | by V. V. Krishna & Rajiv Mishra, CSSP, JNU

Policy Brief: India Science and Technology Cooperation with EU and Other Select Countries
by V. V. Krishna with the assistance of Rajiv Mishra, CSSP, JNU.
INDIGO Policy, Centre for Social Innovation (ZSI), Austria, 2017.

Table of Contents
Introduction
1 EU-India Science, Technology and Innovation cooperation
2 India-US Science, Technology and Innovation cooperation
3 India-Japan Science, Technology and Innovation cooperation
4 India-Canada Science, Technology and Innovation cooperation
5 India-China Science, Technology and Innovation cooperation
6 Concluding summary



INDIGO Policy Brief: Science, Technology and Innovation Policy in India - Some Recent Changes | by V. V. Krishna, CSSP, JNU

Policy Brief: Science, Technology and Innovation Policy in India - Some Recent Changes
by V. V. Krishna, CSSP, JNU
INDIGO Policy, Centre for Social Innovation (ZSI), Austria, 2017.

Table of Contents
Foreword
Introduction
1 Some general features | 1.1 Structure of gross expenditure on Research and Development (GERD) | 1.2 Structure of S & T research system governance |  1.3 Main research performers | 1.4 Intermediary organisations |1.5 Cluster organisations | 1.6 Knowledge production
2 Methodology
3 Evolution of India's Science, Technology and Innovation policy | 3.1 Science, Technology and Innovation policy 2013
4 New government and current changes of STI 2015 | 4.1 National flagship programmes | 4.2 New Research and Innovation policies, schemes and instruments 2014–2015
5 Possible impacts on STI cooperation with Europe